[MA-SOC] OT: Insidious new type of spam by hackers - please be careful!

Alain-Christian mynamebackwards at gmail.com
Tue Oct 14 21:22:21 EDT 2008


Yes, e-mail spoofing is old, but would you typically run into it? No.
Further, e-mail spoofing is reserved for spoofing such e-mails as
paypal.com. Who still get infected with e-mail worms, let alone, MAKES
e-mail worms? It's played out! "Hacking" AOL accounts is also played
out. This HAS to be an old chain letter.

On 10/14/08, Clyde Adams III <clydesan at gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi Jill,
>
> Sending spam with the recipient's own email as the spoofed return address is
> not new; it's a very old trick.
>
> Spoofing your return address is easy.  It does *not* require your password.
> That AOL rep was quite ignorant.
>
> Check out, for example:
>
> <http://www.google.com/search?q=spam+from+own+address>
>
> <
> http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2002/11/25/BU168392.DTL
>>
> New spam seems to come from your own address
> David Einstein
> Monday, November 25, 2002
>
>
> Clyde
> New York City Anime: Events, clubs, shops, and more
> http://nyc-anime.com/
>
> On Tue, Oct 14, 2008 at 10:39 PM, <Oneirophile at aol.com> wrote:
>
>> Mina-san,
>>
>> I wanted to give you all a heads-up about a new and rather scary kind of
>> spam.  I recently got one of those bogus Viagra ads, masquerading as a
>>  Microsoft
>> Corporation announcement.... nothing unusual about that.  So I  sent it to
>> my
>> spam folder.  But when I checked my spam folder again just to  see who the
>> offending sender was, I discovered that the "From" was my very own
>> e-mail!
>>  Not
>> similar, not a variation, but completely identical to  mine.
>>
>>
>> I immediately moved the bogus ad out of my spam folder, fearing  that I
>> would
>> be reporting my own e-mail as a spammer.  I then phoned AOL  and spoke to
>> one
>> of their reps.  He told me that this tactic is unusual,  but not unheard
>> of,
>> and it means that someone got access to my AOL  password.  That was even
>> more
>> scary, because I have never told *anyone* my  AOL password.... not even my
>> husband or my son.  And I've never typed my  password into any e-mails or
>> online
>> forms, either (I know better than to do  that!).  Apparently, the new
>> generation of hackers knows how to crack  passwords without even tricking
>> their
>> victims into revealing them.
>>
>> The AOL rep told me that all we could do is to run a scan with our
>>  antivirus
>> software (we've got up-to-date McAfee), and to change my password more
>> frequently.  There's no other recourse -- I cannot report it as spam,
>>  because I'd
>> be reporting my own e-mail as the sender.
>>
>> The moral of the story is this:  When you get spam, do  NOT automatically
>> send it to the spam folder without first checking the  sender.  If the
>> sender
>> appears as your own e-mail, it means that your  password has been cracked
>> and you
>> should not send it to the spam folder, -- just  delete it and run a virus
>> scan IMMEDIATELY.  After the scan is complete be  sure to change your
>> password.... and change it more often in the future.
>>
>> Just a word to the wise from
>> your sadder-but-wiser buddy,
>> Jill
>>
>> + + + + + + +  + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
>> VOCATUS ATQUE NON VOCATUS DEUS  ADERIT
>> ("Bidden or not bidden, God is present")
>> + + + + + + + + + + + + +  + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
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